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Workplaces are catching up to the future. Meet the companies and individuals who are making it happen.

  1. Flexibility Is the Best Way to Care for Your Caregiving Employees

    Flexibility Is the Best Way to Care for Your Caregiving Employees

    Add the Pew Charitable Trusts to the list of workplace flexibility proponents. "Building flexibility into work schedules can help employees stay in the labor force, which is critical to their economic stability. It also can help employers recruit and retain the people they need," the organization asserts as it reports the results of a 2018 study of flexibility and caregivers.

  2. Want to Cultivate a Stronger Workforce? Let Your Employees Travel the World

    Want to Cultivate a Stronger Workforce? Let Your Employees Travel the World

    No matter how you slice it, the world is becoming more flexible. As long as you have a reliable Wifi connection and a quiet place to take calls, you can really complete your tasks from anywhere—as long as you’re not a neurosurgeon or an astronaut, of course. But as physical location becomes less and less relevant to the work we do, how do we continue to gain new social skills, build trust and camaraderie among our colleagues, and collaborate effectively? It’s something I recently chatted about with Greg Caplan, founder and CEO of Remote Year, a company that helps employees get out of the office and explore the world.

  3. MicroAgility Can Give Your Company the Most Room to Lead

    MicroAgility Can Give Your Company the Most Room to Lead

    Chances are, you've accessed or given access to MicroAgility before, even if you've never heard of it. If you've ever gone to a doctor's appointment in the middle of the workday, for instance, you've used MicroAgility. If you've ever let an employee come in late because their toilet overflowed, that's MicroAgility. Life is messy, but MicroAgility allows employees to clean up the mess by giving them the autonomy to step away for a short period of time to accommodate interruptions so that they don't become major distractions—without having to use up hard-earned PTO hours. And though a lot of us have used MicroAgility at some point in our careers, it's typically baked in to an organization's culture. That's a big problem.

  4. TravelLite Is Becoming Imperative for Corporate Social Responsibility

    Want to Be a Leader in Corporate Social Responsibility? Put a Cap on Air Travel

    If the "triple bottom line" is social, environmental, and economic—or people, planet, and profit—it's safe to say that the environmental cause was given short shrift until climate change became a climate crisis. IE Business School professor Enrique Dans discusses the greening of corporate social responsibility (or CSR) in a recent Forbes essay, citing the emergence of the "carbon economy" that seeks to eliminate more carbon dioxide than is emitted into the atmosphere. "Following this principle, some companies have begun to redefine their CSR policies to prioritize the environmental, which until a few years ago was considered simply by many as a 'nice to have,' giving the annual report a feel-good factor," he adds.

  5. Our Obsession With Long Hours Is Only Widening the Gender Pay Gap

    Our Obsession With Long Hours Is Only Widening the Gender Pay Gap

    In 1974, as a recent New York Times article points out, sociologist Lewis Coser coined the term "greedy professions" to describe jobs that "seek exclusive and undivided loyalty.” At the time, however, long hours weren't glorified as they are now. People who worked 50 hours or more a week four decades ago were paid 15 percent less per hour than their 40-hours-a-week peers. Now, according to new research, people working 50 hours or more a week are paid 8 percent more than those working fewer hours.

  6. Life-Work Balance Is the Top—But Not the Only—Reason Workers Want Flex

    Life-Work Balance Is the Top—But Not the Only—Reason Workers Want Flex

    With the workforce beset by always-on connectivity and workweeks of 50, 60, or more hours per week, workers have been striving for work-life balance—or, at least, jobs that are more compatible with one's personal life. So it's no surprise that work-life balance topped FlexJobs' ranking of reasons why people seek flexible work options in its 2019 annual survey. But respondents also cited more than a dozen other reasons, all of which substantiate what a comprehensive HR solution flexibility can be.

  7. Employee Burnout Has Made an "Alarming" Rise, New Research Shows

    Employee Burnout Has Made an "Alarming" Rise, New Research Shows

    After surveying more than 20,000 employees and leaders in 15 countries, researchers at the O.C. Tanner Institute have published startling findings on the state of the global workforce. "In spite of some positive changes in corporate culture, we have uncovered a new wave of challenges," the organization writes in the report, citing a "growing frustration with conventional workplace practices" and an "alarming increase in burnout."

  8. Both Men and Women Are More Likely to Leave Their Jobs Without Flexibility

    Both Men and Women Are More Likely to Leave Their Jobs Without Flexibility

    There's a misconception that workplace flexibility is just an "accommodation for women." Women do indeed have a high demand for adaptive workdays—especially because they're still expected to shoulder more than their fair share of caregiving responsibilities, housework, and other invisible labor. But men need flexibility, too, and new research from the Boston Consulting Group shows that men are actually more likely to leave jobs in inflexible work environments.

  9. Looking Forward With Emily M Dunn

    Looking Forward With Emily M. Dunn, Workplace Knowledge Consultant at Herman Miller

    If anyone knows that no two workers work the same way it’s Emily M. Dunn, Workplace Knowledge Consultant at Herman Miller, who has extensive expertise in physical workspaces. As Emily tells me in this edition of Looking Forward, there’s no one-size-fits-all work environment. Companies have to give their employees the flexibility to work in environments that suit their individual needs and the task at hand, especially considering some tasks require constant communication and others require heads-down focus.

  10. Inflexibility Is Costing You Financially and Reputationally

    Inflexibility Is Costing You Financially and Reputationally

    When David woke up to his phone’s alarm, he was desperate to hit snooze. But as a recently-single parent, he had no one to turn to for help getting his 2-year old son off to daycare. Since daycare was a temporary situation only to buy him some time, the urgency and reactivity that prevailed in his day-to-day experience managing his kids and career began taking a huge toll on his ability to think clearly, take care of himself, and function effectively.

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